Cooking with Soybean Granules

‚When in doubt, go make some food‘ has been my motto for decades. Writing this, I realize, makes me sound ancient, which is probably a matter of perspective. I started cooking when I was around 15-16. It was after my dad had passed away, my mom was working full time, and in the afternoons, I’d come home to an empty apartment, starving. Note to the millenials: there were no school cafeterias, back then. So I’d make pasta, most of the time, because there were fixings for that in the cupboard.) Over the years, my skills have expanded. I had a lot of practice, and also I always enjoyed making food, for myself and for others. Cooking kept me sane and reasonably well nourished, and I’m still curious to try out new things.

My daughter’s request for eating less beef for environmental reasons made me consider alternatives for ground beef, because this family eats quite a bit of that (meatballs, spaghetti Bolognese, lasagna, chili con carne, tacos … it’s a staple, in this house.) So I did some research and found this at the organic food store:IMG_4261On the package, it said it was good for all the above mentioned recipes, so I decided I’d try out – well, not meat, but fried soy mince balls. In the instructions, I was advised to soak the dry soy granules in 3 times the amount of hot water or broth for 10 minutes before use. Well, I did, and it turned out a sad and soggy mess. Even though I strained it and pressed the hot water out as best I could, it was still very wet. It did _not_ look appealing, but then again, neither does ground meat, so I figured I’d season it the way I would meat balls (a bit more spicy perhaps) and see where it took us. I mean, I didn’t expect great things in terms of flavor from such an extremely processed food. It looks like it will taste bland, right?

No Meat Soy Balls

1 cup soy crumbs

2 shallots

1 clove garlic

5 sage leaves

2 sprigs parsley

1/2 TSP Oregano (dry)

1/2 TSP thyme (dry)

1/2 TSP dill (dry)

1/4 TSP cinnamon

1/4 TSP paprika

1 TSP mustard

1 TSP Ajvar

Salt and pepper to taste

2 eggs

Like I always do, I coarsely chopped the shallots, garlic and herbs, added spices, condiments and eggs, and then blitzed the whole thing – it’s the only way to make my daughter eat meatballs, for there can be no discernible pieces of onion, herbs or the likes in there. It’s just the way she rolls.

Then, I added the soaked and drained-squeezed soy crumbs, mixed everything with a fork, and set aside for a couple minutes. After which I added half a cup of _dry_ soy crumbs. Still too moist, so I added 1/2 cup flour, and 1/2 cup buckwheat. Annoyingly, it was still too moist to make decently shaped patties. So I poured dry breadcrumbs on a plate, took portions out of the mixing bowl by the spoonful and rolled those in the breadcrumbs. Then I fried the patties in oil. And that worked:

IMG_4257After a couple minutes browning from both sides, I took them out, let them drain on kitchen paper, and tried one:IMG_4258Then I jogged over to my vegetarian bestie with a sample, and got both her approval and the request for the recipe, which I thought I’d write up real quick before I forget what went in there.IMG_4260Verdict: The non-meat balls turned out to be tasty. My friend said they reminded her of falafel (she’s from the Middle East), I thought they tasted like meatballs, and my daughter said she had not expected them to be edible, but was pleasantly surprised. High praise, right?

So, that was the first adventure with soybean granules. I’ll research non-meat ragú next.

Have a lovely week, everybody.

What’s A Week-end…?

IMG_4201Remember the Dowager Countess, mother to Downton Abbey heir Lord Grantham, ingeniously portrayed by the great Dame Maggie Smith? This was one of her infamous remarks, when confronted with a person from the working class whom she had a conversation with, unfamiliarly not in the capacity of them being her staff. It was a doctor, I think. The concept of working during the week, and then resting for two days was just so very foreign to her ;-). I found it hilarious, which is probably why I still remember it, even though I haven’t watched Downton in years.

Our lives today couldn’t be more different, of course. I think in my person alone, I embody the characters of Ms Patmore the cook, Lady Grantham the lady of the house, Branson the chauffeur and Daisy the maid. I plan meals, I cook, I grocery shop, I clean up after the kids, I take care of everybody’s laundry, I drive the kids (not right now, because none of us really goes anywhere, but usually.) When my husband is here (and he has been since mid March, working from home, just like everybody else) we share these duties. Also, we both work a lot. Bringing up kids, helping them through school, keeping them fed and clean and happy is a job of its own, as every parent knows. And despite all that being a lot, sometimes, most of the time, everything somehow falls into place, occasionally with some shaking and rattling, but all in all, rolling.

As a self-employed person, I have some leeway in terms of when to do what, and I like it like that. Also, it’s very useful if I need to tend to a child at the drop of a hat. But it does mean my life is a very mixed bag: tasks I’m paid for, stuff I have to do even though I’m not, and generally many, many little things in between. And thanks to my therapist, Dr K, religiously, mindfully taken breaks.IMG_4210My morning today is a good example. I woke up early, read for a bit, took a short morning walk with the pup, made tea, got back in bed for Sunday morning cuddles with dog & daughter, and some way too difficult Sudoku. Made breakfast, cleared up, proofread some work I had done yesterday, emailed said work and the invoice, checked my bank statements while I was at it, and then clicked on a blog I follow, since I was already on the computer.

Quarantine has changed everybody’s schedules. Homeschooling and -office have caused the days to bleed into each other, and while I have much respect for the notion of work-life balance, I suspect I’m either not very good at it, or I’ve mastered the task of just doing both while not being affected by the fact that there’s no clear distinction between the two. So that made me think of the Dowager Countess and her gentle discombobulation regarding week-ends, this fine Sunday :-). Maybe I’ll have to re-watch Downton and see if I can ease back into it?

So Elfie has settled in nicely, thank you for asking. We installed an elaborate cat tree in my son’s room, with various things to climb into and sit on, which she seems to appreciate. Next week, we plan to have her explore her new realm (formerly known as our apartment) a bit more, one room at a time, and we plan to properly introduce our two animals. Wish us luck for that.

Craft-wise, I’m nearly done with the baby blanket for our young neighbor, check it out:IMG_4213I’ll have to try out a few things for the border, I was thinking maybe something like I made for my daughter’s Dotty Blanket?IMG_5629Off-white and a final round of picots? Maybe one teeny tiny row of pink SC strewn in? We’ll see. Looking forward to tinkering with that. I love borders!

Have a good start into next week, everybody, stay sane, safe and healthy.

A Memorable Day

What a Mother’s Day I had this year! The kids made breakfast and gave me a cute and thoughtful gift, we took a beautiful walk through the green forest, I got to soak up a load of sunshine and do some lakeshore crochet. It was a very good day. And then, I got to do the ultimate Mama thing and give my son his heart’s desire: we have a new cat.IMG_4170Meet Elfie. She’s 13 years old, has the most amazing blue eyes and the fluffiest fur – and she’s a sweet and friendly creature. We picked her up at the shelter, where they were more than happy to give her to us. Apparently, people don’t take in older animals much. I mean, it’s not the same as adopting a kitten, obviously, there’s a different timeline, and different needs. But we know our way around an elderly cat, and we just followed our hearts.

We had met her on Friday, when we were there to just have a look around, and we bonded with her right away – and then we sort of talked about little else all weekend. My son did a complete 180 (he’d been talking about a young black tomcat, and what we got was, well, the opposite, in every way :-D!) When we went back on Sunday to have Elfie meet Charlie, we ended up just taking her with us. Why wait? We had made up our minds. And my boy can’t stop smiling, so I’d say without a trace of irony that that went well.

And man, is it nice to hold a purring kitty! My heart melts at the sound :-). Even though it belongs to this li’l dude, mostly, along with all the rest of my body, which he feels very proprietary about.F18821CE-CFB9-4964-BE14-450161AFC6E5May Elfie be happy here at our zoo.

Quarantine Crafts

One thing I’ve noticed over the course of the Corona crisis is that my capacity for being surprised seems to have diminished. It’s probably a coping mechanism, emotional detachment, or just my psyche reacting to all the weirdness by refusing to engage. I mean, everything seems so different from what we’re used to, and you can’t freak out all the time, so it seems just as well to stay aloof.

So I’ll just mention, with little emotion, that it seems unusually chilly for May. Mother’s Day which is this coming Sunday (don’t forget, those of you who still have moms!) used to bring peonies and lilies of the valley … which I have already seen, so it may be a glitch or the Ice Saints…IMG_3929Anyway, it did register that the pup was shivering when I met an old friend yesterday morning and stopped to chat for a minute. Putting him in his winter coat seems excessive, it’s like 10 °C. A sweater, on the other hand – well. Who would say no to a stripy sweater?IMG_4100Second project: yet another Ripple Baby Blanket – in two colors this time, no more. I know I started out with the monochrome Granny Squares

but somehow, me and the pattern just didn’t click, so I ended up doing something both completely different and more than familiar, as you can see.

There’s a subtle difference to all the other blankets I’ve made in this pattern, though – the pink stripe is a single row of SC at a time, instead of repeating the ripple pattern, which is based on DC. This makes the colored stripe thinner and more noticeable both, if that makes any sense. Anyway, I like it, and I’m making decent progress on it, while watching old Star Trek episodes with my daughter most nights.

It will go to my downstairs neighbor who had her baby last but last week – it’s s cute sound, hearing a new tiny voice in the house. I’ve yet to meet little R in person, but I’ve received pics and she looks very, very cute.IMG_4082As you can see above, my socks are finished, and I’m enjoying them a great deal, even though the colors are NOT my usual palette. They remind me of spring, and of daffodils, which I love, despite their intense shade of yellow. Yellow is not an easy color to wear, but on my feet, it should be fine ;-).

Asked by my daughter what my next project will be, I had to confess I didn’t know yet. Maybe finally finish the couch throw I started two years ago ;-))?

The truth is that I’ve frogged most of it (down to the turquoise bit), and I’m not even sure I actually like the DC pattern anymore. There’s so many textured stitches that are more interesting – we’ll see. But it does seem like a nice project for the summer, looking at those pics.

Also, my little monkey’s outgrown most of her hand knit socks, so I may end up making new ones for her first. Lord knows I have quite the sock yarn stash to work with.

Any crafts projects you’d like to share? I’d love to see them, please send pictures, since we can’t meet in person for the time being.

Stay well, everybody, and if you’re a parent, enjoy the extra time we’re given with our kiddos. There’s a gift in there :-).

Away From It All, But Not Quite

IMG_3923As of yesterday, we’re back to homeschooling, I’m 50 odd pages in on my new book translation, and my husband has gone back to working from home after two productive weeks of vacation spent taking care of his garden, and painting our kitchen, bless him. Corona seems very far away, out here in the country. Things are more quiet than usual, we’ve had no visitors, and we think twice about going grocery shopping, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

As I mentioned before, the book I’m translating is about people who’ve stripped their lives down to the bare necessities, living in Caravans, mobile homes, refurbished school buses or Tiny Houses. Of course, while I work, I can’t really help wondering how I’d do if I were to live like that, and questioning what it is I’d need to be happy. Thinking about it made me realize how little that actually is: A roof over my head, food on my table, my family safe around me, some sort of heating. I’d probably want a bit more creature comforts than the average mobile home provides (i.e. my own toilet and a source of hot water), but it seems that even these things are doable if you’re prepared to deal with emptying the black water and grey water tanks every week, which seems a small price to pay for being able to go pee at night in your own space if you need.

I admire these people for their dedication to doing their thing, and I can relate to their distrust of the rat race most of us participate in to pay our bills. Writing jobs can be done from the road, too, so I suppose I could do what I do for money from a mobile home, if it were required. Well. I have two school children, so maybe not any time soon. But maybe one day.

There are all sorts of scenarios for what the world after Corona will look like, and some of them paint a bright picture of humankind coming to their senses and changing their ways into a sustainable way of living. Personally, I don’t believe that will happen, as long as the world leaders are what they are, and don’t even get me started on the US government’s way to deal with the crisis, which seems abysmally ignorant of the most vulnerable people in their society – hopefully people will see that and vote accordingly.

Yesterday night, I watched our chancellor’s press conference in which she implored everybody to hang in there, and carry on the way we have been for the last few weeks. She said to not be fooled by the fact that small businesses have been allowed to open again yesterday, and correctly pointed out that we will only know in two weeks whether the infection rates will spike because of it or not, and that it’s entirely possible things will have to go back to being stricter again in case they do.

A valid reminder, and I’m glad I watched it. It’s easy to forget, out here. I feel privileged and thankful to be able to have my spot in the sun, and my healthy family to enjoy it with.

One thing I’ve noticed is that people seem to cook more, and it’s one of my friends‘ pet peeves at the moment, their running out of ideas of what to make for their brood. And since I _never_ have a shortage of ideas when it comes to food, I thought I’d jot down a few things I’ve made over the last couple weeks, quarantine cooking, if you will.

No. 1 – Wild Garlic Pesto

What you see is what you get – pick a handful or two of wild garlic, add a bunch of basil leaves, pine nuts, Pecorino or Parmesan cheese, salt & pepper to taste, and generously slosh over good olive oil. Puree with a stick blender or in a food processor, and have with: pasta, on a sandwich, with grilled or poached fish, or as a dip with crackers.

IMG_3955No. 2 – Home-made Pizza

As long as you can find yeast (there was none to be had before Easter, until I was pointed towards a bakery by a very helpful sales assistant at the supermarket, and may I say it was very good, fresh yeast they sold there under the counter!), make a fluffy dough with a good few TBSPs of olive oil added. Let rise. Make a decent tomato sauce, put veggies or meat on your pizza, top with mozzarella slices and a sprinkling of Oregano, and you’re done.

No. 3 – Meatballs and Potato Salad Mediterranean Style

My newest meatballs hack is making a paste of onions, mustard, herbs, paprika, salt and pepper, egg(s) and – wait for it – a generous spoonful of Ajvar, which is a smooth paste of roast peppers and garlic popular in the Balkans. THEN add the ground beef and mix well. Make the meatballs and fry in oil. For the potato salad, add chopped celery sticks, green onions and red peppers, as well as chopped parsley to the cubed boiled potatoes and vinaigrette. It’s an an unusual version of the classic potato salad, but very tasty, and good with hot and cold meatballs.

IMG_3883No. 4 – Asian Style Glass Noodles Salad

This was based on a recipe from one of Jamie Oliver’s older books. As far as I remember it contained two central ingredients I didn’t have (prawns and fish sauce), also I did my own version of five spices (probably only had three of them or so – cinnamon, ginger, cumin), but I did have a rest of fresh cilantro, and some roasted peanuts, and it turned out alright! Fried ground beef with spices, added soy sauce, chopped cilantro, 1 chilli pepper and a generous amount of chopped peanuts, squeezed one lemon, added a TSP of maple syrup and some extra olive oil, cooked the vermicelli and mixed it all together. Yum!

IMG_E3856No. 5 – Rhubarb Cake With Very Little Flour

This happened because rhubarb’s in season, yay! Also I wanted to try out a version of cake batter that used ground almonds rather than flour; I had seen Antoni the Cook make almond flour pancakes on Queer Eye, and I was going to try that out. It went well. I separated the eggs and creamed the butter, used light brown sugar and a bit of maple syrup, and put way more of the peeled & chopped rhubarb on top of the cake batter than seemed reasonable. Oh, and I dusted the batter with some cream o‘ wheat before putting the rhubarb on top, to prevent the cake from becoming too soggy, and I sprinkled a generous spoonful of sugar on the rhubarb before the cake went into the oven.

IMG_3897No. 6 – Easter Bun(ny)

Do everything as you would for a big, sweet cinnamon bun, then use a bit of the dough to make ears, and thinly slice a date or two to make the face. Easy! This happened on Easter Sunday, and it made our family and a few neighbors really happy.

No. 7 – Finnish Pannukakku, courtesy of Pen Pal B.

So, this was an experiment, okay? It’s not actually supposed to look like this – check out pics online and you will see it’s usually flat, and while it’s in the oven, the corners inflate and rise spectacularly, but most of the pannukakku (Finnish for pancake, in case that wasn’t obvious) actually stays kind of thin. Which is not what happened when I made it. But it was lovely anyway, warm and sweet and very indulgent – a breakfast for weekends. Find a recipe online, and try it – not sure I’m allowed to share hers here. Basically a thick pancake batter with melted butter. Eat with fruit preserves, maple syrup, or sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon.

img_0219No. 8 – Crisp Fried Lamb Cubes and Green Beans on Pilaw Rice

A recipe from my gorgeous Turkish cookbook. The thing that makes the meat so special is that you boil it down in soda water before frying it in butter or olive oil. An unconventional cooking method I had not heard of before, and tried out of curiosity, and that turned out to be absolutely delicious. And since lamb, in my opinion, calls for green beans, I always make it with a side of those, and serve it on a bed of pilaw-style white rice. (Add cubed onions, salt and butter while boiling the rice.)

So you can see that a lot of cooking for the brood occurred. On top of the recipes shown and described, there were also many salads: mixed, cucumber salad, Caprese salad; mac’n‘ cheese, several times; we grilled hamburgers and steaks; I made absolutely lovely kohlrabi in a white sauce with fresh dill; also a cauliflower and broccoli casserole, only enjoyed by my husband and myself; roast chicken thighs with vegetables, sweet potato and potato wedges; I tried my hand at home-made fries (which turned out a bit on the soft side, but were nice all the same); pasta and tomato sauce; loaded omelets; I don’t know how many slices of grilled cheese; apple pancakes; regular pancakes; banana pancakes… it’s surprising I got any work done, when I read through that list!

Crafts have taken a back seat, for now. I did start on a granny square blanket for my baby neighbor who is due any day now – I’m trying out a color sequence that dotted the baby blanket I made for my friend M’s little girl earlier this year. Not sure how it’s going to turn out yet:IMG_3982Also, I’ve continued on a pair of color block socks for myself, but that’s about it.

IMG_3981So, that’s what the last two slow weeks of Pandemic Easter Break were like. In between all the cooking and work, I spent every minute I could here:

with these two dudes:

Could have done a lot worse, I feel.

Thank you for checking in, friends, and: stay safe, stay sane, stay healthy!

Not Very Focused

IMG_5574Those of you who follow this blog can probably guess why my concentration is all over the place today. To my surprise, I actually slept last night, and while I didn’t sleep very deeply, and woke up a few times, I don’t feel like a total zombie either.

My lizard brain hasn’t caught on yet – every time I get up and walk away from my computer, I catch myself walking down the hallway to check on Fritzchen. I swear I can hear her distinct „Eeow“ all over the apartment… I know this is just me processing, and I also know it will stop, eventually, if maybe never completely. What will change over time is that after a while thinking of her will make me smile, rather than feel the cringe-y sensation of loss. This is not yet how it is today.

Trouble is, I have a really urgent website translation I need (want) to submit by end of the week. It’s for one of my long-time, dear clients, a renowned portrait photographer who also has a few prestigious advertising clients. (Good for him, because obviously, all of his shoots are cancelled for now.) So, writing about luxurious, beautiful handcrafted leather goods. But since my attention span is like a teenager’s today, I thought I’d pop over here and chat every once in a while.

So, we’re all socially isolating ourselves like good little citizens, right? Right. How is that going for you guys? What are your coping strategies? I imagine it must be truly painful for the extroverts among us – some of the people from the entertainment industry I follow on SM are posting regular gems, sprung from their need for contact. It’s really touching to see how they tell us about recipes they tried, chicken they burned, or the correct way to clean a pan after they did (hot water ;-)!). Skincare tips, pet videos, admonishing the public to #staythefuckhome. I watch Jamie Oliver’s IG videos, which are always inspirational.

It may sound weird, but my own everyday life has not changed all that much. Really! I do miss seeing my friends, but for now, I’m actually quite content living in the little bubble of our nuclear family. It’s more people _all the time_ than I’m used to, after all, what with my husband home officing and my kids being home from school. And I have work, so I’m lucky.

Walking Charlie has been a welcome respite from all the noise at my house. Cabin fever would be a problem, sooner or later, and I sympathize with people who want to be good about sequestering but have tiny apartments where it’s virtually impossible to stay out of each other’s business… domestic violence is real, and while I certainly don’t condone it, I can see how it would spike under these circumstances. Add impatient young children, or alcohol, to the mix, and bam, it’s not hard to imagine the fights erupting. So, I guess, #staythefuckhome is important, but #gothefuckoutside is, too?

It’s my first spring with my own dog, ergo taking daily walks and literally watching nature wake up a little more by the day is new to me. Shrubs and trees budding and blooming, and the green of the moss gradually being outshone by the chlorophyll-laden explosion on the tips of the branches … it’s a gift, enjoying that with my four-legged lil buddy.

Home schooling has been happening, and I confess I’m more than a little surprised at how well it actually works, considering how new and different it is. My 6th grader is attending tel-cos with team mates and teacher twice a week, and my 12th grader is working on assignments by himself and with classmates, submitting papers and solved math problems via Email. Maybe experiencing mom working her butt off from home has set a good example?

The extra cooking was one thing I did not look forward to – providing, like, two cooked meals a day, in addition to dog duty and work? It scared me, and I said no, not happening. So the kids are getting smart. My son can do really good French Toast. My daughter has successfully graduated to frying eggs all by herself. Of course there have also been trips to the Kebap shop, and a few instances where lunch consisted of a burger and sundae after a walk by the dog lake, and of course lots of yogurts, bowls of muesli, carrots and apples and avocado sandwiches in between. We’re adjusting.

I’ve been assigned a new book, for a publishing house I applied to more than a year ago – and I’m greatly looking forward to this one, because it’s about outdoorsy, escapist people living on the fringes of society: Live-in vans, Winnebagos, houseboats, Tiny Houses – the works. Surfers, bloggers, drifters, environmentalists. Of course, they all have their own ingenious solutions for just about everything from bio degradable toilets to storing food, interior design, solar showers, and finding electricity when needed. It’s amazingly topical, and I applaud the editor in charge for choosing such a book in a time like this.

So, I have managed to translate a few pages of luxury leather items. Some of the nerdy terms I already learned (and forgot, because who needs to know the difference between pit tanned and vegetable tanned cowhide, on a daily basis? Not me!) when working for Manufactum more than a decade ago – their business is popular in the UK, also, and I was in charge of translating this particular product range for their catalog for a few years. Funny how this stuff came back like a boomerang so many years later. Still, my mind is like a bag of fleas today, so it’s been slow going.

My husband and daughter are on a mission to catch her up on James Bond – which is happening next door in the family room. She seems to like Pierce Brosnan, who definitely was my favorite of all the 007s, even though Daniel Craig may be the most unusual actor who ever played him. Here’s an odd story. I stopped watching the franchise after Casino Royal, after leaving the movie theater both shaken and stirred (sorry, could not resist). For the first time, James Bond had a soul. The beautiful love story ended in tragedy – and then, I didn’t want to know any more. They lost a customer by making an unusually good movie, how absurd of me, right?

While grief-binging Star Trek TNG yesterday, I managed to knit half a color block sock. I’m using daffodil colors for this one, a very spring-y color sequence, chosen by my daughter, la Chefesse de la Couleur:IMG_3734So far, I’ve made three pairs like this, four if you count the tiny ones that stayed with baby cousin K in Frankfurt.

They’re fun to make, and perfect for binge knitting because you don’t have to pay a lot of attention to patterns and such. Also, temperatures have not gone back up yet, so I’d say we’ll need them for a bit longer.

Thank you for reading this rambling post about everything and nothing.

A Black Monday

Hey everyone. I’m not even going to get into Covid-19 and the various ways it has impacted all of us over the past few weeks, that probably deserves a post (or several) on its own. I just hope all of you are staying sane, as well as healthy, and I hope to see you guys as soon as we’re not required to socially distance ourselves from each other. It has been weird, but we’ve had a shit sandwich of quite another sort to deal with, as we were accompanying our sweet kitty on the last leg of the last of her nine lives.

As our wonderful vet pointed out today, death can go on and on if you let it. He supported our decision to let her go now, rather than keep her going as a miserable, shaky, pained shadow of herself, just because we weren’t brave enough to make a decision.

So, we went there as a family, and were handed the obligatory Corona face masks. We were given time and a room to ourselves, and the sedative was administered. The lethal shot came when she was fast asleep. Her death was awful, and without fanfare, just like the other times I had the sad job of accompanying a pet on their final journey. Fritzchen stopped breathing around 2 p.m. She would have been 15 in August.

To be honest, I’ve been saying goodbye to this cat ever since she and her sister were diagnosed with kidney insufficiency years ago, trying to brace myself for this bad day, but of course you can’t prepare for this shit. It hurts, and all of us are heartbroken, despite having been well aware this day would come.

But even as I’m crying bitter tears of loss, I mostly feel grateful for the privilege of having lived with her, prickly personality, beautiful black coat and adorable white blaze on her forehead. She was a gorgeous animal, and much loved by all of us, most of all by my boy whose heart I can hear breaking all the way from his room down the hallway. It was he who bore the brunt of caring for her over her last weeks, as she didn’t really leave his loft bed much anymore, and he spent many, many hours there with her, sleeping and awake. He held a night vigil for her yesterday, not wanting to waste her last hours with us. I joined them for a while between 4 and 5 a.m. It was time well spent.

In closing, I’d like to give heartfelt thanks to all of you who thought of us, and prayed for us, and asked after Fritzchen so kindly – we are grateful for each and every one of you. You are making this easier, truly.

And finally: Pet lovers, and especially those who consider adopting: Please do not let this sad tale deter you from taking in an animal. I can’t find words to describe how much great happiness, love, joy and laughter mine have given me over the decades. It’s not even a question for me: I’d never ever want to live without them.

Be safe, everybody, and take care of yourselves.IMG_3235